How well do you communicate? It’s an important question for older adults who choose to age in place.

Even more important is your answer – because the better you communicate the better your quality of life can be.

As we age, our vision, hearing and cognitive processing change. In fact, more than 40% of people over age 65 report hearing problems and 26% have writing problems, according to research published in the National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health.

Older adults don’t see, hear and understand the same as they always did. Unfortunately, that ca…

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One of the best things about summer: the food! And it’s easier than other times of the year to eat healthy.

That’s partly because there’s an abundance of fresh, in-season foods available. Older adults who want to age in place can also cook more often in one of the healthiest ways – that’s on the grill.

“Eating right can help keep your body and mind healthy and extend your quality of life,” says Kathy McManus, Director of the Department of Nutrition and Director of the Dietetic Internship, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, in her research on Harvard Health Publishing. “M…

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It’s time to get outside and enjoy the sun, warmth and all the summer has to offer. But don’t let safety fall by the wayside while you jump into the fun days ahead.

Older adults benefit from getting outside and being active. Participating in safe outdoor activities in good weather can help improve physical and mental wellbeing, according to research compiled by My Open Country. Specifically, older adults who participate in outdoor activities can:

Increase Vitamin D intake, which may reduce the risk of heart disease, dementia, stroke, autoimmune disorders and diabete…

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Many older adults are vaccinated and ready to safely socialize again. Home entertaining is on the agenda for people eager to be with family and friends after a long hiatus.

Not only is socializing fun, it has health benefits for older adults: Socializing keeps feelings of loneliness at bay and helps sharpen memory and cognitive skills, according to Mayo Clinic Psychologist Craig Sawchuk. Socializing also boosts your levels of happiness and well-being.

So here’s help for vaccinated older adults who want to socialize again – five tips for home entertaining.
Consider sa…

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Many older adults want to come out of their winter cocoons to safely socialize again. Is it possible?

Absolutely … as long as you stick to the key idea of safety. The pandemic still wears on, and not everyone is fully vaccinated. You might not face the same isolation as you did last spring. But this year’s socializing won’t be exactly like all the years before either.

Fortunately, older adults can safely socialize. Here are five ways to enjoy friends, family, activities and the outdoors in the coming months. And remember – you’ll want to be vaccinated to interact sa…

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